Sun. Jun 16th, 2024
Is it acceptable for schools to receive funding for surveillance technology?

A group of over 40 civil rights organizations have sent a letter to the U.S. Department of Education, expressing their concern about the use of surveillance technology in K12 schools. They believe that this technology can lead to increased police presence in schools, greater police contact with students, exclusionary discipline, and school pushout, disproportionately affecting marginalized communities like Black, Brown, and Indigenous youth.

The letter demands a ban on federal funds for surveillance technologies and urges the agency to divest discretionary appropriations from funding police surveillance hardware. It also suggests providing technical guidance to support school districts in conducting audits to ensure legal compliance of AI and big data technologies. Furthermore, the authors recommend studying surveillance tools and other algorithmic technologies to understand their risks and potential harm to public schools.

Although several states, including New York, have taken measures such as banning facial recognition technology in public schools, the coalition argues that more action is needed to protect students, families, and educators from the harmful effects of school surveillance technologies. They urge the Department of Education to take immediate action to end this dangerous transformation of America’s public schools.

In recent years, there has been an increasing use of surveillance technology in K12 schools across the country. The coalition believes that this trend is putting at risk the privacy and safety of students and teachers alike.

The letter highlights several studies that have shown how surveillance technology can lead to increased police presence in schools and greater police contact with students.

Additionally, it cites examples of how this technology has been used disproportionately against marginalized communities like Black, Brown, and Indigenous youth.

The coalition believes that these practices are not only unethical but also harmful to young people’s academic success.

It calls on the Department of Education to take immediate action by banning federal funds for surveillance technologies and divesting discretionary appropriations from funding police surveillance hardware.

Furthermore, it recommends providing technical guidance to support school districts in conducting audits to ensure legal compliance of AI and big data technologies.

The coalition also suggests studying surveillance tools and other algorithmic technologies to understand their risks and potential harm to public schools.

Overall, the letter underscores the need for urgent action by policymakers at all levels of government

By Aiden Nguyen

As a content writer at newscholarly.com, I delve into the realms of storytelling with the power of words. With a knack for research and a passion for crafting compelling narratives, I strive to bring forth engaging and informative articles for our readers. From decoding complex concepts to unraveling current events, I aim to captivate and educate through the art of writing. Join me on this journey as we explore the ever-evolving landscape of news and knowledge together.

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